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AC3Filter:Gains page

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This page contains gain level settings.

AC3Filter: Gains page

Contents

[edit] Bass redirection

Here you can enable and adjust Bass redirection feature.

Enable
Enable/disable bass redirection
Cutoff frequency
Crossover frequency. Simply saying, it defines what the bass is. Everything below this frequency will be routed to bass channels (see below).
Bass destination
Defines channels where the bass will be routed to.
Subwoofer
Route the bass to the subwoofer. You have to choose an output format that has a subwoofer to make this option to work (you can do it at Main page.
Front channels
If you have big front speakers, but small rear ones, you can route the bass from rear to front speakers. Choose this option only is you have no subwoofer at all.

Level at the left side shows the volume of the bass being redirected. But note, that this activity is not synchronized with actual audio playback. You can see the bass you currently hear at output levels monitor.

[edit] Delays

These are delays for each output channel. There are two main applications of delays:

Delay values can be set in different units (Units selection list). Positive values for time units mean that positive delay will be introduced, i.e. the sound will be delayed. Conversely, positive values for distance units mean negative delay, i.e. the sound will be played ’in advance’. In both cases, there can be negative delay values.

[edit] Input gains

Gain levels of input channels. Sometimes it is required to change gain levels namely of input channels. That’s the case when the input signal has a central channel while the output one has no central channel (the center is mixed to front channels), and it is required to change dialog level namely. I.e. these levels are intended for record defects compensation.

[edit] Output gains

Gain levels of output channels. These levels serve for speakers loudness equalization (if speakers are located asymmetrically). In other words, they serve for compensation of acoustic system defects.